What used to travel under the name of DIY, craft and reuse has generate a concentrated coalition of stakeholders under the Maker label. What binds many of these groups together is their emphasis on "hand on" experiences for learning and the importance of manifesting our imagination in tactile, material social spaces.

Maker Organizations


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http://schoolfactory.org/
"The School Factory is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization that creates value-creating communities and spaces that transform education." They have two initiatives: 1) "We support and create community environments like hackerspaces, makerspaces, co-working spaces, and other places where diverse communities come together to build, make, and teach one another." 2) "We support and create programs that engage people in the creation of communities of practice--focused on a culture of creativity, constructivism, and project-based learning."


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http://www.gemsi.org/
Think, create, share. A movement is spreading that enables people to solve problems, start businesses and be wonderful to each other and we want to see it go global. GEMSI aims to build inclusive communities focused on service and taking initiative from Baghdad to Detroit and beyond.

MAKE http://makezine.com/

MAKE unites, inspires, informs, and entertains a growing community of resourceful people who undertake amazing projects in their backyards, basements, and garages. MAKE celebrates your right to tweak, hack, and bend any technology to your will. The MAKE audience continues to be a growing culture and community that believes in bettering ourselves, our environment, our educational system—our entire world. This is much more than an audience, it's a worldwide movement that Make is leading—we call it the Maker Movement.

Maker Education Initiative: Maker Corps

http://makered.org/makercorps/

The Maker Education Initiative has launched the Maker Corps program to address the need for personalized support and expertise in introducing maker-oriented experiences in existing educational programs across the nation.


U.S. Maker Centers

The Maker Map Locator

http://themakermap.com/


NYSCI (NY Hall of Science)

http://www.nysci.org/
Built initially as a pavilion for the 1964 World's Fair, the New York Hall of Science is now New York City's hands-on science and technology center. Since 1986, NYSCI has served over seven million children, parents and teachers. NYSCI's mission is to convey the excitement and understanding of science and technology to children, families, teachers and others by galvanizing their curiosity and offering them creative, participatory ways to learn. NYSCI features the largest collection of hands-on science exhibits in New York City. Visitors of all ages can explore over 450 interactive exhibits.

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http://www.omsi.edu/
The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is a scientific, educational, and cultural resource center dedicated to improving the public's understanding of science and technology. OMSI makes science exciting and relevant through exhibits, programs, and experiences that are presented in an entertaining and participatory fashion. Beyond the many workshops, programs and installations, OMSI hosted their first Mini-Maker Faire in 2012.